"oUR LIVES BEGIN TO END THE DAY WE BECOME SILENT ABOUT THINGS THAT MATTER..."

Burn Pits: The "Agent Orange" of the Iraq War

CONTACT US

Electron Imaging of Samplings

Images left are from ambient dust samples collected at military bases in Iraq. Particles were observed using secondary electron imaging and Nuclepore® filters.


Findings included zinc/lead particles, possibly from the smeltering of lead and batteries. Carbon chains were found to contain high concentrations of lead, bromine and chlorine which is associated with burning of fuel and emissions from leaded gasoline.

The provided information leads to the determination that melting down and smoldering of materials including vehicles, electronic components, unexploded ordnance and a variety of plastics proves to be harmful and exposes communities to toxic levels of dioxins and metals like lead, mercury and cadmium, and can cause metal pollutants to become trapped within military base boundary walls, as seen in the measurements from Baghdad, Balad and Taji (Engelbrecht et al., 2008).


Dr. Robert Miller of Vanderbilt University Medical Center states “the dust in Iraq is composed of a silica-core encased in a calcium carbonate, dust particles are small enough for dozens to fit on the head of a pin…” (Miller, 2013, pg. 6). The smaller in measurement the particulate matter is, the deeper into the lungs the particles can travel.